Non-Immigrant Visas

Experienced Immigration Attorneys Serving Santa Barbara

There are many reasons you might visit the United States on a temporary basis. You may be visiting for an extended vacation, studying abroad, seeking specific medical treatment, or taking a temporary position for employment. As you are not immigrating permanently to the United States, you will need a non-immigrant visa. There are many types of these visas, depending on the purpose of your visit. These include, but are not limited to:

  • Business visitors
  • Crewmembers
  • Exchange visitors
  • International organization employees
  • Athletes, artists, or entertainers
  • Au pairs, nannies, or other domestic employees
  • Journalists
  • Temporary workers
  • Tourists
  • Students
  • NAFTA professional workers
  • Religious workers
  • Specialty occupation workers

These visas allow holders to stay in the United States for a limited time, and permit them to study, visit, or work in the U.S. The length of time varies between visas. Once the visa ends, the holder must leave the country, or risk being accused of unlawful residence.

Obtaining a Non-Immigrant Visa

A non-immigrant visa is obtained through U.S. embassies and consulates. You will need to apply for a visa, provide the necessary documentation, pay your fees, and interview with a consular officer. You must be able to show that you have the economic means to support yourself during your stay in the United States and have the qualifications required by your specific visa type, if you are seeking a visa for a skilled position.

Changing Your Status or Extending Your Stay

You may wish to change the purpose of your visa once you are in the U.S. If you came as a student who wishes to work in the country, or a tourist who wishes to stay and attend school, you must change your visa status. You can do this by submitting an application to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to change status.

If you wish to extend your stay beyond the end of your visa, you must do so before the expiration date of your visa. When you enter the country, you will be given an I-94 card with an expiration date. You must file your extension with the USCIS before this date.

Need Help with Your Non-Immigrant Visa?

Our team at Appel & Morse boasts over 30 years of experience navigating complex immigration issues. If you need help filing, extending, or changing the status of your non-immigrant visa, we are available to help. Our committed team of immigration attorneys can guide you through the process, and we believe that your needs are of the highest importance.

Contact our Santa Barbara immigration attorneys at Appel & Morse to learn how we can assist you with your visa.